Five ways to reclaim your physical and mental rhythm

Go Red for Women_GRFW Logos_Web + Powerpoint_png files_GRFW_LOGO_CMYK_Red+Black

The American Heart Association and its Go Red for Women movement are helping women create healthy habits that work best for their life, to give them the best chance at life because losing even one mom, sister, friend, or neighbor to cardiovascular disease is one too many. 

With everything that’s happened in the last two years, even those people who normally focus on their health have lost their rhythm. CVD is still the greatest health threat, but COVID – and all the complexity of life because of it – remains top of mind. People are experiencing lower physical and emotional wellness. And, heart disease deaths rose significantly last year. 

Now’s the time to Reclaim Your Rhythm and take back control of your physical health and mental well-being. Here are five ways to reclaim your rhythm:

Mellow Out and Reduce Stress 

Stress leads to unhealthy habits like overeating, physical inactivity, smoking and risk factors for heart disease and stroke like high blood pressure, and depression or anxiety.

Move to the Music

Physical activity is linked to lower risk of diseases, stronger bones and muscles, improved mental health and cognitive function and lower risk of depression.

Feed Your Soul, Rock Your Recipes

Eat meals together as a family for a chance to connect and decompress. Regular meals at home with family reduce stress, boost self-esteem and make the whole family feel connected.

Stay on Beat with Blood Pressure
High blood pressure is a leading cause and controllable risk factor for heart disease and stroke and can contribute to worse outcomes for people who contract COVID-19.

Keep the Beat!
Learn Hands-Only CPR When a person has a cardiac arrest, survival depends on immediately receiving CPR from someone nearby. o Help your community reclaim their rhythm by learning the 2 simple steps of Hands-Only CPR: Call 911, then press hard and fast in the center of the chest.

To learn more, visit www.heart.org.

More from Around NYC