Column: Major business and corporations are funding the destruction of the middle class

California Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat.
Photo courtesy Twitter

The war on America’s middle class has burst into the open. The attacks by progressive politicians, corporate elites, and the media is pervasive and undeniable.

From coast to coast, the message is clear: middle income citizens, the backbone of the nation, are being pushed aside and characterized as the enemy.

Almost immediately after being sworn into office, President Biden ended the Keystone XL Pipeline, wiping out middle-income jobs by the thousands. His attacks on the middle class went further. In a number of measures aimed at curtailing fuel production, he initiated skyrocketing energy prices that will devastate family budgets. In the process, American energy independence was also destroyed.

Biden’s war on decent-paying employment can be seen clearly in his open border policy. Flooding the nation with illegal immigrants will dramatically shoot down wages and job opportunities for citizens. His party’s determination, in cities throughout the nation, to open up voting to non-citizens will make it difficult for voters to reject this move. Democrats, who now receive the bulk of contributions from major businesses, have repaid their corporate sponsors.

In California, notes the Mercury News, Gov. Gavin Newsom, in one of his first acts after surviving a recall attempt, essentially abolished single-family zoning, long both a staple and a goal of the middle income. This too, is a giveback to corporate contributors.  Owners of single-family homes do not contribute much to political campaigns. However, big real estate developers, long used to buying political favors, are major donors. Just one example, out of thousands: On the opposite coast from Newsom’s California, in the middle-income New York City neighborhood of Throggs Neck, a real estate developer has plans to build a large apartment building which will contain numerous units for poor tenants, destroying the character of the community and slashing the value of middle income private homes. The area is represented by U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who has not objected.

Next on the agenda: crippling taxes. Despite public pronouncements that tax hikes will only affect the rich, Progressives are advocating a tax scheme that will force motorists to pay a tax based on how many miles they drive. Another concept will cause family businesses to pay unaffordable inheritance taxes when passed from one generation to the next. And, as is well known from long experience, taxes on the so-called “rich” never seem to produce the revenue the Left wants to spend on their massive programs.  Soon, “rich” is defined down so that a middle-class family with two earners, (say, a school teacher and a firefighter) find themselves in the bracket defined as wealthy.

In what may seem as a contradiction to Democrats’ addiction to corporate money, they plan to raise corporate taxes. However, every political lobbyist in existence knows that corporate tax laws can be written to make their major clients safe; small businesses, lacking the funds to retain lobbyists, will be hit hard. Of course, the whole concept of taxing businesses higher than international competitors is foolish. Big business is mobile. Raise taxes in the U.S., and they will easily move their headquarters elsewhere, taking their jobs with them. Small businesses generally lack that option.

Middle income families need to be safe, as, indeed, do all citizens. But the Left’s bid to defund the police jeopardizes that. However, many of the very same politicians who want to reduce or eliminate your police protection use your tax dollars to hire private security for themselves.

Next on the campaign against the middle class: your car. Washington’s Progressive politicians are full-steam ahead in their attempt to ram electric cars down consumers’ throats. Electric vehicles cost on average between $10,000–$55,000 more than gas vehicles.

Can’t afford it? Too bad! The politicians will tell you to take public transit, if it exists near you. After all, the companies that build buses and subways contribute a lot more to campaigns than a middle-class family.

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