Platinum Protection to refund distressed senior

Platinum Protection has agreed to refund money to Norma Argenti because their security system wasn’t accessible for her handicapped son. Photo by Walter Pofeldt

When a local area senior came forward and said she was the victim of an overly aggressive sales pitch by a particular home security company, it seemed like a popular theme.

Now, the senior who cares for an incapacitated son, will receive a full refund.

Norma Argenti of Country Club, said Platinum Protection placed the burglary and emergency alarm panel in such a way as to make it inaccessible to her wheel-chair bound son.

Argenti had contacted a lawyer and wrote to the New York State Consumer Protection Board, saying she had been “played like a fool and lied to” about the merits of the system, which she said never worked the way she wanted it to.

Platinum Protection finally responded on Thursday, January 8 and said they would remove the system and issue a refund.

“They came on the morning of [January 9] and removed the system,” Argenti said. “Platinum Protection said they would issue me a refund check in seven to ten days.”

Three seniors in Throggs Neck and Pelham Bay, over a five-month period in 2008, claimed they were victims of overly aggressive sales pitch by representatives of Platinum Protection, a Provo, Utah-based security company.

Argenti said that on June 16, a man came to her home and knocked on her back door, extolling her in the merits of a Platinum Protection security system.

“[The salesman said] he was putting alarms in all of the houses on the block for safety,” Argenti stated in a letter to the New York State Consumer Protection Board dated September 30. “They installed the alarm inside the basement door after I said it was no good for any of us as my son cannot walk, stand, or climb stairs.”

Also in the summer, Adeline Cervone of Paine Street in Waterbury-LaSalle said that a salesman for the company sold her a system that didn’t function the way she wanted and demanded fees as high as $2,000 if she wanted to terminate the contract early.

After contacting Senator Jeff Klein and Councilman Jimmy Vacca, Platinum agreed to remove the system and cancel the contract.

A few weeks later, senior Thomas Alessandro in Throggs Neck came forward and said they had also been sold an alarm system under duress.

Through all of these incidents, in written communication with the New York State Consumer Protection Board and contact with news agencies, Platinum’s stance is that they were distressed about the customer’s dissatisfaction with their products and wanted to do everything possible to remedy the situation.

Jake Nielson, a spokesman for Platinum Protection, said that Argenti was let out of her contract because the alarm could not be installed in a location where it was accessible for her and her son. He said this was because the signal for the alarm would not work in another location inside the house. Nielson said she wanted to

When a local area senior came forward and said she was the victim of an overly aggressive sales pitch by a particular home security company, it seemed like a popular theme.

Now, the senior who cares for an incapacitated son, will receive a full refund.

Norma Argenti of Country Club, said Platinum Protection placed the burglary and emergency alarm panel in such a way as to make it inaccessible to her wheel-chair bound son.

Argenti had contacted a lawyer and wrote to the New York State Consumer Protection Board, saying she had been “played like a fool and lied to” about the merits of the system, which she said never worked the way she wanted it to.

Platinum Protection finally responded on Thursday, January 8 and said they would remove the system and issue a refund.

“They came on the morning of [January 9] and removed the system,” Argenti said. “Platinum Protection said they would issue me a refund check in seven to ten days.”

Three seniors in Throggs Neck and Pelham Bay, over a five-month period in 2008, claimed they were victims of overly aggressive sales pitch by representatives of Platinum Protection, a Provo, Utah-based security company.

Argenti said that on June 16, a man came to her home and knocked on her back door, extolling her in the merits of a Platinum Protection security system.

“[The salesman said] he was putting alarms in all of the houses on the block for safety,” Argenti stated in a letter to the New York State Consumer Protection Board dated September 30. “They installed the alarm inside the basement door after I said it was no good for any of us as my son cannot walk, stand, or climb stairs.”

Also in the summer, Adeline Cervone of Paine Street in Waterbury-LaSalle said that a salesman for the company sold her a system that didn’t function the way she wanted and demanded fees as high as $2,000 if she wanted to terminate the contract early.

After contacting Senator Jeff Klein and Councilman Jimmy Vacca, Platinum agreed to remove the system and cancel the contract.

A few weeks later, senior Thomas Alessandro in Throggs Neck came forward and said they had also been sold an alarm system under duress.

Through all of these incidents, in written communication with the New York State Consumer Protection Board and contact with news agencies, Platinum’s stance is that they were distressed about the customer’s dissatisfaction with their products and wanted to do everything possible to remedy the situation.

Jake Nielson, a spokesman for Platinum Protection, said that Argenti was let out of her contract because the alarm could not be installed in a location where it was accessible for her and her son. He said this was because the signal for the alarm would not work in another location inside the house. Nielson said she wanted to

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