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Parkchester Resident Wins Angela Merici Medal from College of New Rochelle

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Parkchester resident Margaret Comaskey commitment to education helped her receive the Angela Merici medal from the College of New Rochelle.

Comaskey, a 1961 graduate from the college, received the medal during the CNR 76th Annual Alumni College Weekend in June.

According to the college’s press office, the medal is “ bestowed upon outstanding alumnae/i for their exceptional loyalty to the church and to the college as well as for distinctive achievement in their careers.”

“I’m grateful,” Comaskey said of receiving the medal. “It reflects my appreciation of the college and what it does for expanding education to a wider and wider group of people.”

Throughout her career, Comaskey has shown a dedication to education.

She earned a chemistry degree from CNR and a Ph.D in physical chemistry from New York University.

After graduating, she spent a brief time in teaching before making a career in textbook publishing, working for Worth Publishers, Inc.

In addition to her commitment to education, she has also worked with the her church and many of its charitible organizations

Currently, Comaskey attends the Church of St. Anthony in Manhattan and works as a communications volunteer for the Sisters of Charity Center in Riverdale.

The charity, according to its website, works to reveal “the Father’s love” by helping “all in need, especially the poor.”

Comaskey, now retired, said she has more time to give to the church and has become more involved in charity work.

She said, “Faith really does cover everything one does.”

She’s also noticed that “even if it isn’t church related, people tend to do a lot of good to help other people.”

In addition to doing charity work, Comaskey also volunteers as a teacher at the New York Botanical Garden.

“Botany when you get into it is even more interesting [than chemistry],” said Comaskey.

Comaskey said her favorite part of teaching young children at the garden is to help them “discover and learn about science and encourage them at an early age that they may learn and grow with it.”

Posted 12:00 am, August 4, 2016
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