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Deja Vu liquor stopped

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The recent Déjà vu liquor license cancellation stands following a court hearing that lifted a temporary restraining order requested by the club’s owner.

On Wednesday, October 7 a public hearing was held by Senator Jeff Klein to announce the cancelation of the nightspot’s liquor license, meant to go into effect on Friday, October 9.

In an unexpected twist, owner Rob Karagi filed for a temporary restraining order against the State Liquor Authority’s decision to cancel the license.

After learning of the development Klein immediately contacted the SLA to request they file a motion to rehear the argument in order to resolve the issue as quickly as possible.

On Friday, October 16, the order was lifted and license cancelled.

“For more than a year I have fought to have Déjà vu’s liquor license cancelled. When I found out Déjà vu’s management filed for a temporary restraining order last week, I continued fighting for my constituents, pushing for the order to be lifted,” said Klein. “Today, we won again and I hope Déjà vu will finally stop disrupting the community once and for all.”

According to Klein, following the hearing at Bronx County Courthouse, the judge ruled that the 778 Morris Park Avenue establishments had to surrender its liquor license by 6 p.m.

“Now we have closure to this ongoing dilemma. We took the owner’s word that he would change his ways and only a few minor concessions were made,” said Joe Bombace, CB11 member.

The final hearing between Déjà vu and the SLA was scheduled for Wednesday, October 21.

“If he would have just changed his venue. We need a hand down here, something like a high end steak house,” said Robert Ruggiero, president of the Morris Park Alliance.

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