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New facility opens to serve children with special needs

A new facility has opened up serving special need children throughout the Bronx.

For young children with disabilities it may be difficult to find the delicate care and service needed, especially when they reach the age where schools begins.

The nonprofit organization, the Kennedy Child Study Center, has been helping children with special needs since 1958, celebrating their 50th anniversary this September.

Originally having only two locations throughout the city, in Manhattan and Bronx, on March 25th, an annex of the Bronx school opened its doors at 1071B East Tremont Avenue, very close to the Bronx’s main building.

The new building was created to expand the center, whose occupancy is always at maximum capacity, and demanding more space.

“We are at capacity on 179th, we need more for these children so when we had the opportunity to open a new facility we were happy,” explains Peter Gorham, executive director of the Kennedy Child Study Center, “we would like to expand even further.”

The new facility features six state-of-the-art classrooms, including computers and necessary equipment to maximize the students learning capabilities.

Each classroom allows 12 students, ranging in age from three to five years old. The population of the school consists of 65% Latino and 25% African American, aiming to primarily treat children of low-income homes.

Each room is assigned one head teacher and two teaching assistants. Additional staff can be provided should a student require individual care or treatment.

“Studies show the children show progress through time the more you intervene,” states Kristy Chau, head teacher at the Bronx annex.

The new building contains three speech therapy rooms, with 95% of enrollees attending speech therapy twice a week. It also includes an occupational and physical therapy room frequently used.

The Kennedy Child Study Center also offers four early intervention classes at the main Bronx facility. This allows children under age three, showing signs of disabilities, to seek help at an earlier stage.

Enrolling children earlier gives them a better chance later in school,” expressed Sari Anthony, director of development and communications.

The center also provides support outside the classroom, for parents and caregivers. For more information visit info@kenchild.org.

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