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Rock on the Bronx

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ITEM: Bronx bassist Eric Mauriello is working harder than ever these days. Eric started playing in the Bronx way back in the day in a band called Paradox. Today he is a busy session and touring bass player plus an up and coming independent producer. Here’s just a few of the things he is currently working on.

He produced 2 songs with  songwriter Danny James: “Save our Love” with Sandy Gennaro on drums (from Joan Jett, Cyndi Lauper and currently playing with Micky Dolenz of The Monkees) and “Thick And Thin” with Liberty De Vitto on drums (Billy Joel).

www.myspace.com/DannyJamesSongs if you want to check some of that out. Eric is still touring with Little Anthony and The Imperials. The group is celebrating their 50th Anniversary. Their new CD ‘You’ll Never Know’ which features new songs as well as some ‘reworked classics’ is now available for download on iTunes and Amazon.com. The group is scheduled to appear on David Letterman on Aug 26 and they filmed segments for the CBS Sunday Morning Show which will probably air in late August or early September.

ITEM: Bronx actor/writ­er/producer Wayne Gurman and director William Lappe will be having a special preview of their new full length movie “Bronx Paradise” screened as part of the Locust Point Summer Movies on the Beach. This particular movie is 18 and over. Admission fee is $10 with all proceeds going to the further repair and upkeep of the civic house. For further information act quickly and contact Jerry Landi at landijerry@yahoo.com. THE BROKEN STEPS will perform at 8:30 p.m.

ITEM: I heard someone say rock is dead. I don’t believe this but yes the rules are changing. What were once fundamental touch stones of rock, the 45 single, the album, then the CD, the rock video are now all moving away to be replaced by what is anyone’s guess. Another problem facing the credibility of rock is manipulation of audiences and the self conscious awareness of all musicians. Musicians are too aware of the who, what, where and how a career in music should go. Raised on MTV and the E Channel has made musicians want to get into the music business for fame and money and not for the love of it. I think the ones who truly make it have an unshakable love of it. Those musicians are just as content playing in front of 20 people or 20,000 people. A sense of entitlement will never cut it in music. Locally it’s harder then ever for bands to find a steady venue and audience. Part of this is because of the age old problem of a lopsided market: a handful of clubs and a million bands.

Don’t you see where all the power is? Now with the economy in flux, with the thought of having a cocktail and a cigg considered more taboo than ever and the traditional market of baby boomers, who use to loyally support their favorite bands, dwindling, its harder than ever for people to disagree with the statement that rock is dead. The thing to remember is rock and roll is a lifestyle and a feeling. It can never really die. It might hit some rough spots but as long as there are people grabbing a microphone, a guitar, a bass or getting on a pair of drums to pound out the frustration of their lives then there will always be rock. And on that note: Rock on! Rock out!

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